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Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Coffee

According to legend coffee was discovered by an Ethiopian goat herd called Kaldi. He noticed that goats who ate certain beans became very lively. Coffee was drunk in Yemen by the 15th century. By the 16th century coffee had spread to Persia (Iran) and Turkey. There were many coffee houses where people could drink and also socialize.

Coffee reached Europe in the late 16th century through trade. Coffee was introduced into Italy first. (Today coffee is still a very popular drink among the Italians). Coffee really became popular in Europe in the 17th century. In the 1600s coffee houses opened across Europe. The first coffee house in England opened in Oxford in 1651 and by the late 17th century there were many coffeehouses in English towns where merchants and professional men met to drink cups of coffee, read newspapers and chat. www.localhistories.org/coffee

Monday, 20 June 2016

Catherine Macaulay

Catherine Macaulay was a famous woman historian of the 18th century. Catherine was born into a wealthy family in Kent, England on 2 April 1731. She was privately educated. On 18 June 1760 she married Dr George Macaulay. Catherine wrote a great work called The History of England. It was in 8 volumes. The first volume was published in 1763 and the last in 1768. Catherine also wrote a book called Letters on Education in 1790. She argued for co-education of boys and girls. She also opposed slavery and capital punishment. Catherine died on 22 June 1791.

Wednesday, 15 June 2016

Magna Carta

On 15 June 1215 King John sealed Magna Carta. But we can never take our freedoms for granted. We must always be vigilant.

Saturday, 11 June 2016

Friday, 10 June 2016

Salem

On 10 June 1692 the first person convicted of witchcraft was hanged at Salem, Massachusetts. It all began when young girls began accusing people of 'bewitching' them. Both men and women were hanged for witchcraft and a man named Giles Corey was pressed to death.  www.localhistories.org/salem

Saturday, 4 June 2016

Emily Davison

On 4 June 1913 British suffragette Emily Davison was killed when she ran onto a racetrack to grab the bridle of the king's horse. Its a myth that she deliberately threw herself under the horse. And her behavior was condemned by many as irresponsible. Queen Mary, wife of King George V wrote to the jockey saying she hoped he was not too badly injured by the 'abominable conduct of a brutal lunatic woman'. http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/may/26/emily-davison-suffragette-death-derby-1913