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Friday, 30 December 2016

Happy New Year

Happy New Year everybody! www.localhistories.org/newyear 

Rasputin

Rasputin was murdered on 30 December 1916 www.localhistories.org/rasputin 

Thursday, 29 December 2016

Tuesday, 27 December 2016

Monday, 19 December 2016

Saturday, 17 December 2016

Friday, 16 December 2016

Jane Austen

I wrote a brief bio of Jane Austen. She was a famous writer of the early 19th century www.localhistories.org/austen 

Wednesday, 14 December 2016

Saturday, 10 December 2016

Women vote in Wyoming

In 1869 the Wyoming legislature passed a law giving women the right to vote. The governor signed it on 10 December 1869. http://www.localhistories.org/womenvotetime 

Friday, 9 December 2016

John Milton

John Milton was born on 9 December 1608. He was a great writer but also a defender of freedom of speech www.localhistories.org/johnmilton

Monday, 28 November 2016

Thursday, 24 November 2016

Charles Darwin

On 24 November 1859 Charles Darwin published his great work, On the Origin of Species www.localhistories.org/darwin

Tuesday, 22 November 2016

Monday, 21 November 2016

The first balloonists

On 21 November 1783 two men, Jean Francois de Rozier and the Marquis d'Arlandes became made the first untethered hot air balloon flight.

Arizona

I wrote a brief history of Arizona www.localhistories.org/arizona 

Sunday, 20 November 2016

Women Surgeons

Two women surgeons were recorded in London in 1593, Elinor Sneshell of Valenciennes in France, . Not all surgeons in 16th century London were men. If anyone needs a reference its in a book called Elizabeth's London by Liza Picard published by Weidenfiled & Nicolson in 2003.

Friday, 18 November 2016

Suffragettes

On 18 November 1910 suffragettes tried to force their way into the British House of Commons. There were 119 arrests. http://www.heretical.com/suffrage/1910tms1.html 

Thursday, 17 November 2016

Queen Mary

On 17 November Queen Mary died. She was the first woman to rule the whole of England www.localhistories.org/mary

Monday, 14 November 2016

Who invented the elevated railway?

Its debatable if anyone can be said to have 'invented' the elevated railway. It is, after all merely a railway raised above ground level. However the first elevated railway was in London. It was completed in 1838. The first elevated railway in New York was built in 1868. www.localhistories.org/transport 

Friday, 11 November 2016

The refrigerator

No one man invented the refrigerator. The first refrigeration device was made by William Cullen in 1748. In the 19th century many inventors developed better and better refrigeration devices. But the first refrigerator for use in the home was invented by Fred W Wolf in 1913.

Thursday, 10 November 2016

Who invented the fire escape?

A man named Daniel Maseres invented the fire escape in 1784. During the 19th century better and better fires escapes were patented. Nevertheless Mr Maseres was the pioneer so he should be remembered. www.localhistories.org/firefighting

Monday, 7 November 2016

Marie Curie

The great scientist Marie Curie was born on 7 November 1867 (She was born Maria Skoldowska in Warsaw, Poland www.localhistories.org/curie

Sunday, 6 November 2016

Housework

About housework: John B Porter invented a portable ironing board in 1875 and Henry Seeley invented the electric iron in 1882. No one man invented the washing machine. In 1782 Henry Sidgier patented a hand operated device for washing clothes and during the 19th century different men patented better designs. The first electric washing machine was made about 1907. A man named Joel Houghton invented a dishwasher in 1850 but it was not a success. The first successful dishwasher was invented by Josephine Cochrane in 1886. Hubert Booth invented the vacuum cleaner in 1901. In in 1950 Canadian Harry Wasylyk invented the bin liner or garbage bag. www.localhistories.org/housework

Saturday, 5 November 2016

Bonfire Night

Remember what Bonfire Nights all about folks, a Catholic plot to blow up parliament. wwwlocalhistories.org/gun 

Friday, 4 November 2016

Paper bags

The first machine for making paper bags was invented by a man named  Francis Wolle in 1852. http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/paperbag.htm 

Who invented the circular saw?

An interesting article about who invented the circular saw http://ronin-group.org/shop_circular_saw_history.html 

Hungarian Uprising 1956

On 4 November 1956 Communists brutally put down a revolution in Hungary. Soviet aircraft bombed the capital, Budapest and Soviet tanks and troops poured in. The Hungarians had to wait 33 years for their freedom. www.localhistories.org/hungary 

Thursday, 27 October 2016

Wednesday, 26 October 2016

Norway

Happy birthday Norway. On 26 October 1905 Sweden recognized Norwegian independence. www.localhistories.org/norway

Monday, 24 October 2016

HMS Warrior

HMS Warrior Britain's first iron warship launched in 1860. Photo by Bea Mendyk

Quisling

On 24 October 1945 the Norwegian traitor Vidkun Qusiling who ran a puppet government under the Nazis was hanged. For a time quisling was a synonym for traitor but that seems to have died out. www.localhistories.org/norway 

Thursday, 20 October 2016

Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Alaska

Alaska passed from Russia to the USA on 18 October 1867.Happy Alaska Day. www.localhistories.org/alaska 

Timothy Evans

On 18 October 1966 the queen granted Timothy Evans a royal pardon. Evans was wrongly convicted of murdering his wife and child in 1950.He was hanged. www.localhistories.org/capital 

Friday, 14 October 2016

Catherine Parr

I wrote a brief biography of Catherine Parr. She is famous as the 6th wife of Henry VIII and she was an erudite and capable woman. www.localhistories.org/parr 

Thursday, 13 October 2016

Shark Arm Case

I wrote about a famous case in Sydney, Australia in 1935 when a captured shark regurgitated a human arm  www.crimehistories.org/shark.html  

Saturday, 8 October 2016

Chicago

Chicago was devastated by a fire in 1871. The Chicago fire began on the evening of 8 October in a barn. According to legend it was caused by a cow knocking over a lamp. At any rate the fire spread through Downtown Chicago where houses were made of wood and it burned until 10 October. About 100,000 people, about one third of the population were made homeless and about 300 people were killed. www.localhistories.org/chicago

Friday, 7 October 2016

Bess of Hardwick

I wrote about Bess of Hardwick. She was a very rich woman in 16th century England. She is famous for her great house Hardwick Hall. www.localhistories.org/bess

Wednesday, 28 September 2016

Thursday, 22 September 2016

Monday, 19 September 2016

Tudor Food

I made a Youtube video about 16th century English food https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plmqvPcLabc

Tuesday, 13 September 2016

Queen Elizabeth I

You often hear that the last words of Elizabeth I were 'All my possessions for a moment of time' In fact there is no evidence she ever said that and nobody knows what her last words were. I found this interesting quiz of myths about Elizabeth I. See how many you can get right! http://www.elizabethi.org/contents/myths/index6.html 

Thursday, 1 September 2016

Wednesday, 31 August 2016

Polly Nichols

On 31 August 1888 Mary Ann 'Polly' Nichols was murdered. She is widely believed to have been the first victim of Jack the Ripper. www.crimehistories.org/jack 

Friday, 26 August 2016

Women in the Middle Ages

I wrote about women in the Middle Ages. There were many strong and capable women in the Middle Ages. In that era women had to work hard just to survive. www.localhistories.org/middlgeageswomen

Wednesday, 24 August 2016

Saturday, 20 August 2016

Leon Trotsky

On 20 August 1940 Leon Trotsky got an ice pick that made his ears burn. He died the next day. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pg2np37JNEg

Monday, 15 August 2016

Friday, 12 August 2016

Monday, 8 August 2016

Tycho Brahe

On 8 August 1576 work began on building an observatory for Tycho Brahe the great Danish astronomer www.localhistories.org/brahe

Saturday, 6 August 2016

Wednesday, 27 July 2016

Insulin

On 27 July 1921 Frederick Banting and Charles Best isolated insulin at the University of Toronto

Tuesday, 19 July 2016

Mary Rose

On 19 July 1545 Henry VIII's warship the Mary Rose sank near Portsmouth. But it was raised from the sea bed in 1982. It is now a popular museum. www.localhistories.org/maryrose 

Monday, 18 July 2016

Women Scientists

This is my youtube about some early women scientists https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SU0QIHFrzs

Jane Austen

On 18 July 1817 the great English woman writer Jane Austen died. she was only 41 www.localhistories.org/austen

Sunday, 3 July 2016

Quebec

Happy birthday Quebec. Samuel de Champlain founded the city on 3 July 1608.

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Coffee

According to legend coffee was discovered by an Ethiopian goat herd called Kaldi. He noticed that goats who ate certain beans became very lively. Coffee was drunk in Yemen by the 15th century. By the 16th century coffee had spread to Persia (Iran) and Turkey. There were many coffee houses where people could drink and also socialize.

Coffee reached Europe in the late 16th century through trade. Coffee was introduced into Italy first. (Today coffee is still a very popular drink among the Italians). Coffee really became popular in Europe in the 17th century. In the 1600s coffee houses opened across Europe. The first coffee house in England opened in Oxford in 1651 and by the late 17th century there were many coffeehouses in English towns where merchants and professional men met to drink cups of coffee, read newspapers and chat. www.localhistories.org/coffee

Monday, 20 June 2016

Catherine Macaulay

Catherine Macaulay was a famous woman historian of the 18th century. Catherine was born into a wealthy family in Kent, England on 2 April 1731. She was privately educated. On 18 June 1760 she married Dr George Macaulay. Catherine wrote a great work called The History of England. It was in 8 volumes. The first volume was published in 1763 and the last in 1768. Catherine also wrote a book called Letters on Education in 1790. She argued for co-education of boys and girls. She also opposed slavery and capital punishment. Catherine died on 22 June 1791.

Wednesday, 15 June 2016

Magna Carta

On 15 June 1215 King John sealed Magna Carta. But we can never take our freedoms for granted. We must always be vigilant.

Saturday, 11 June 2016

Friday, 10 June 2016

Salem

On 10 June 1692 the first person convicted of witchcraft was hanged at Salem, Massachusetts. It all began when young girls began accusing people of 'bewitching' them. Both men and women were hanged for witchcraft and a man named Giles Corey was pressed to death.  www.localhistories.org/salem

Saturday, 4 June 2016

Emily Davison

On 4 June 1913 British suffragette Emily Davison was killed when she ran onto a racetrack to grab the bridle of the king's horse. Its a myth that she deliberately threw herself under the horse. And her behavior was condemned by many as irresponsible. Queen Mary, wife of King George V wrote to the jockey saying she hoped he was not too badly injured by the 'abominable conduct of a brutal lunatic woman'. http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/may/26/emily-davison-suffragette-death-derby-1913

Monday, 30 May 2016

Saturday, 28 May 2016

Guillotine

Happy birthday Joseph-Ignace Guillotin, born 28 May 1738. He proposed that there should be a swift and humane method of executing people in France. The French Assembly agreed to his idea in 1791 and the first decapitating device was built. The first person to be executed by the new machine was Nicolas Jacques Pelletier in 1792. The guillotine was last used in France in 1977.

Monday, 23 May 2016

18th Century Women

There were a number of great women, writers and scientists in the 18th century. Maria Kirch (1670-1720) was a great astronomer. Laura Bassi (1711-1778) became professor of anatomy at Bologna University in 1732. Maria Agnesi (1718-1799) was a famous mathematician and Emilie du Chatelet was a woman physicist and mathematician. Caroline Herschel (1750-1848) was a famous astronomer. Catharine Macaulay was a famous historian. In 1792 Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) published a book called A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. In 1784 Elisabeth Thible became the first woman to travel in an untethered balloon

Thursday, 19 May 2016

Saskatoon

Saskatoon was founded in 1883 by a group of temperance Methodists from Toronto led by John Neilson Lake. It was probably named after a local berry. However at first Saskatoon was a tiny settlement. The railway reached Saskatoon in 1890 but it remained very small with a population only a little over 100. However in the early 20th century Saskatoon boomed. By 1911 its population had soared to 12,000 and by 1931 it was 43,000. www.localhistories.org/saskatoon

Wednesday, 18 May 2016

Saxon Food

Saxon women brewed beer. Another Saxon drink was mead, made from fermented honey. (Honey was very important to the Saxons as there was no sugar for sweetening food. Bees were kept in every village). Upper class Saxons sometimes drank wine. The women cooked in iron cauldrons over open fires or in pottery vessels. They also made butter and cheese. Saxons ate from wooden bowls. 

Saxons were fond of meat and fish. However meat was a luxury and only the rich could eat it frequently. The ordinary people usually ate plain food such as bread, cheese and eggs. They ate not just chickens eggs but eggs from ducks, geese and wild birds. www.localhistories.org/food 

Monday, 16 May 2016

Chocolate

Chocolate is made from the fruit of the cocoa tree, which is native to Central America. It grows large round fruits containing seeds or beans, which are used to make chocolate. However for centuries people drank chocolate rather than ate it. People in Central America drank chocolate as early as 1,500 BC. Much later the Mayans and the Aztecs drank chocolate. The Aztecs called it xocolatl from which are word chocolate is derived. After the Spanish conquered Central America they bought cocoa beans back to Europe. The beans were roasted and ground and used to make a drink with hot water. The Spanish added sugar to make it taste sweeter and they stirred it with a wooden stick to make it foamy. At first chocolate was drunk only in Spain but in the 17th century chocolate spread from Spain to the rest of Europe. 

Thursday, 12 May 2016

Florence Nightingale

Florence Nightingale was a great woman of the 19th century. She helped to reform nursing. www.localhistories.org/nightingale Florence was born on 12 May 1820. She was named after the Italian city where she was born. 

Sunday, 8 May 2016

Joan of Arc

On 8 May 1429 the French, inspired by Joan of Arc broke the English siege of Orleans. It was a turning point in the Hundred Years War which ended with England losing all territory in France except Calais. www.localhistories.org/joan 

Monday, 2 May 2016

Catherine the Great

On 2 May 1729 Catherine the Great was born. She was empress of Russia 1762-1796. She was not the first woman to rule Russia but she was a formidable leader. She put down a rebellion and she enlarged Russia's borders. 

Wednesday, 27 April 2016

Mary Seacole

Mary Seacole was a Jamaican nurse who treated sick and injured soldiers during the Crimean War. Mary Seacole was born Mary Jane Grant in Kingston Jamaica in 1805. (At that time Jamaica was part of the British Empire).  She traveled to Crimea herself in 1855. Mary ran a boarding house called the British Hotel. She also sold provisions and when she was not working there Mary worked tirelessly treating sick and injured soldiers. They called her Mother Seacole. When the war ended in 1856 Mary returned to England. In 1857 she wrote a book called Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole. www.localhistories.org/seacole

Thursday, 21 April 2016

Monday, 18 April 2016

Christine de Pisan

Christine de Pisan was a great woman writer of the Middle Ages. Her father Tommaso was a famous academic and she was born in Italy about 1363. When she was an infant Christine and her family moved to France, where her father was employed by the French king. In 1379 Christine married Etienne de Castel. Christine had 3 children, 1 girl and 2 boys. However her husband died young in 1390.


Christine was devastated and she took to writing poetry to express her grief. Soon she gained a reputation as a gifted poet. Christine became a professional writer. She wrote on many subjects, often defending women Among her famous books are Letters to the God of Love (1399) and The Book of the City of Ladies (1405), which championed women and their place in society. Her last work was The Poem of Joan of Arc written in 1429. Christine de Pisan died around 1430.

Saturday, 16 April 2016

Wilbur Wright

Happy birthday Wilbur Wright, pioneer of aviation (1867) http://www.wwbirthplace.com/ 

Friday, 15 April 2016

Titanic

In the early hours of the morning on 15 April 1912 the Titanic sank with great loss of life www.localhistories.org/titanic

Wednesday, 13 April 2016

Margery Kempe

Margery Kempe was an English mystic of the Middle Ages. She is famous for her autobiography. 

When she grew up Margery married a merchant named John Kempe. Soon she fell pregnant. In those days pregnancy was hazardous and many women died in childbirth. Margery had a difficult pregnancy and labor. Afraid that she was dying she sent for a priest to confess her sins to. However the priest spoke to her very harshly and this seems to have triggered a period of mental illness. Eventually Margery Kempe had a vision of Jesus. He said 'Daughter why have you forsaken me, for I have never forsaken you'. Afterwards she returned to normal.

Saturday, 9 April 2016

Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Isambard Kingdom Brunel the great 19th century engineer was born on 9 April 1809 in Portsmouth www.localhistories.org/brunel



A memorial to the great man in Portsmouth

Thursday, 7 April 2016

Julian of Norwich

Julian of Norwich 1342-1416 was a great Christian mystic and writer of the Middle Ages but little is known about her. It is a myth that women were unimportant in the Middle Ages. Some women like Julian certainly did have influence. However we know very little about her life. Julian (also known as Juliana) was probably born in Norwich. She certainly spent most of her life there. At that time Norwich was one of England's largest and most important towns. It was a centre of the wool trade although during Julian's lifetime the population was devastated by plague. In the 14th century Norwich had a population of about 10,000, which made it a big town by Medieval standards.

Julian described herself modestly as 'a simple creature, unlettered'. However she probably did have some education and some knowledge of theology. Julian was in her 70s when she died, which was unusual for that time.

Wednesday, 6 April 2016

A biography of Hildegard

Hildegard was a writer in the 12th century. She was born about 1098 in Germany. Hildegard came from an upper class family. She was one of ten children. When she was 15 Hildegard became a Benedictine nun. In 1136 when she was about 38 Hildegard became the abbess.

Hildegard claimed that she had visions from the time she was child. What caused them is uncertain.

Her first book was called Scito vias domini or Know the Ways of God. Hildegard completed it in 1151. It covered a huge number of theological subjects including the Church, angels, the Trinity, and the end of the world. Hildegard also wrote a morality play called Ordo Virtutum (order of the virtues).

Meanwhile in 1148 Hildegard announced that God had told her and the other nuns to move to a new location at Rupertsberg near Bingen. They moved about 1150.

As well as theology Hildegard was also interested in the natural world. She made no new discoveries herself but she wrote a compendium of knowledge about the natural world at the time called Physica. Hildegard also wrote a book about medicine called Causes and Cures.

As well as being a great writer Hildegard was also a composer. She composed a cycle of songs called the Symposia. Hildegard was also an abbess and she had to cope with the day to day running of a convent. However Hildegard only allowed girls from noble families to join her convent. In her view it was unnatural for the different classes of society to mix.


Hildegard died on 17 September 1179. She was aged about 81 (an extremely old age in those days). In the Middle Ages Hildegard was an influential woman. Even today Hildegard is remembered as a great scholar and mystic.

Monday, 4 April 2016

20th century women

In 1918 in Britain women over 30 were allowed to vote. More occupations were opened to women during the 20th century. In 1916 the first policewoman (with full powers) was appointed in Britain. The 1919 Sex Disqualification Removal Act allowed women to become lawyers, vets and civil servants. (The first female solicitor was Carrie Morrison in 1922). Also in 1922 Irene Barclay became the first female chartered surveyor.

Nevertheless in the early 20th century it was unusual for married women to work (except in wartime). However in the 1950s and 1960s it became common for them to do so - at least part-time. New technology in the home made it easier for women to do paid work. Before the 20th century housework was so time consuming married women did not have time to work. Manufacturing became less important and service industries grew creating more opportunities for women.


In 1970 in Britain the law was changed so women had to be paid the same wages as men for doing work of equal value. In 1973 women were admitted to the British stock exchange. From 1975 it was made illegal to sack women for becoming pregnant. Also in 1975 the Sex Discrimination Act made it illegal to discriminate against women in employment, education and training. In 1984 a new law stated that equal pay must be given for work of equal value.

Sunday, 3 April 2016

Greek Women

In a rich family the wife was expected to run the home and, sometimes, to manage the finances. However rich women would normally stay indoors and send slaves to do the shopping. Poor women, of course, had no choice. They might also have to help their husbands with farm work. Women, even rich ones, were expected to spin and weave cloth and make clothes.

Girls in Ancient Greece married when they were about 15. Marriages were arranged for them.

Sappho (6th century BC) was a famous Greek woman poet. Theano of Crotona (born c.546 BC) was a famous mathematician. About 150 BC Aglaonike was a woman astronomer.

Friday, 1 April 2016

Education for women in the 16th century and 17th century

In the early 16th century some upper class women were highly educated. Two of Henry VIII's wives, Katherine of Aragon and Catherine Parr were well educated. Queen Elizabeth I was also well educated and she liked reading. Wealthy girls learned music and dancing and needlework. They also learned to read and write and they learned languages like Greek and Latin, Spanish, Italian and French.

However towards the end of the 16th century girls spent less time on academic subjects and more time on skills like music and embroidery. Moreover during the 17th century boarding schools for girls were founded in many towns. In them girls were taught subjects like writing, music and needlework.

Monday, 28 March 2016

Women's work in the Middle Ages

In Saxon Times life for women was hard, rough and usually short. Upper class Saxon women had considerable freedom. Saxon women were allowed to own and inherit property and to make contracts. However most Saxon women had to work hard spinning and weaving, preparing food and drink and performing other tasks.

In the Middle Ages women spun wool and they did cooking and cleaning. Women washed clothes, baked bread, milked cows, fed animals, brewed beer and collected firewood! In the Middle Ages it was not unusual for middle class women to run their own businesses. In England the mystic Margery Kempe ran a brewery and later a horse mill, using horses to grind corn.

Some women became nuns but they too had to work hard. At least they did if they were from poor families. Class distinctions still applied in nunneries. Nuns from rich families were given the easiest work such as spinning wool and embroidery. www.localhistories.org/middle 

Friday, 25 March 2016

History of Easter

The name Easter comes from the Anglo-Saxon name for April, Eostermunath. It means the month of beginnings. In the early years of Christianity there was a dispute over the date of Easter. In 325 the Nicean Council decided it should be on the first Sunday after the full moon after the Spring Equinox. That is why the date of Easter changes each year.
Friday is the day of the week when Jesus was crucified. It is called Good Friday because good meant holy. On that day we eat hot cross buns. The origins of hot cross buns are obscure but in pagan times people baked buns and offered them to the gods. Cross buns with the cross representing the cross of Jesus were first mentioned in the 18th century. In the early 19th century people sold hot cross buns in the street from stalls and so they became known as 'hot' cross buns.


Thursday, 24 March 2016

Ancient Egyptian Women

In Ancient Egypt women had a great deal of freedom. They could come and go as they pleased. They could own property and they could sign contracts. However most women worked in the home. There was a great deal of work to do as most homes were largely self-sufficient. The woman made the families clothes and prepared food such as grinding grain to flour to make bread. In a rich family the woman was kept busy organizing the slaves.

The Egyptians had a goddess of reading and writing called Seshat.

Wednesday, 23 March 2016

Roman women's jobs

Roman women were allowed to own and inherit property and some ran businesses. (In the New Testament there is a woman named Lydia who sold purple cloth). In certain trades some women helped their husbands, especially in luxury trades like perfumery. Furthermore some women were priestesses or worked as midwives or hairdressers.

Tuesday, 22 March 2016

Womens jobs in the 16th century

In 1562 a law, the Statute of Artificers, made it illegal to employ a man or a woman in a trade unless they had served a 7 year apprenticeship. However in the case of women the law was often not enforced. Very often the guilds (who regulated trade) let male members employ their wives or daughters in their workshops. Furthermore if a craftsman died his widow often carried on his trade.

In the 16th century some women worked spinning cloth. Women were also tailors, milliners, dyers, shoemakers and embroiderers. There were also washerwomen.
Some women worked in food preparation such as brewers, bakers or confectioners. Women also sold foodstuffs in the streets. Furthermore a very common job for women in the 16th century was domestic servant. Other women were midwives.

However most women were housewives and they were kept very busy. Most men could not run a farm or a business without their wife's help.

Monday, 21 March 2016

Women in the Ancient World


Women's work in the 19th century

In early 19th century Britain working conditions were often appalling but parliament passed laws to protect women and children. In 1842 a law banned women and boys under 10 from working underground. Then in 1847 a Factory Act said that women and children could only work 10 hours a day in textile factories. In 1867 the law was extended to all factories. (A factory was defined as a place where more than 50 people were employed in a manufacturing process). An act of 1878 said women in any factories could not work more than 56 hours a week.
Meanwhile in the 19th century being a domestic servant was a common job for women.

In 1874 the first successful typewriter went on sale and the telephone was invented in 1876. These two new inventions meant more job opportunities for women. In the late 19th century new technology created more jobs for women. Ultimately technological and economic change transformed the lives of women.
In Britain the first woman to qualify as a dentist was Lilian Lindsay in 1895. The first woman to qualify as an architect in Britain was Ethel Charles in 1898.

Two famous women of the 19th century were Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole. They reformed nursing. In the early 19th century Elizabeth Fry did much to reform prisons.

There were also many famous women writers in the 19th century. Among them were Jane Austen, the Bronte sisters, Elizabeth Gaskell and George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans).

Friday, 18 March 2016

Tuesday, 8 March 2016

International Women's Day

 For International Women's Day here is my video about famous women in history https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grmTVzb5PCc

Queen Anne

On 8 March 1702 Queen Anne became queen of England and Wales, Scotland and Ireland. She was the first woman to rule Britain.

Saturday, 5 March 2016

Friday, 4 March 2016

Lifeboats

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution was founded 4 march 1824. Thank you Lionel Lukin, the man who invented the lifeboat in 1785. www.localhistories.org/transport

Monday, 22 February 2016

Women in Medieval Guilds

In the Middle Ages trade was controlled by organizations called guilds. I found an interesting article about guilds and this is a quote from it: 'Oftentimes when a man died his widow would assume responsibility for the business and take his place in the guild. And guess what? Single women could join guilds in areas where women practiced a craft, and they were considered equal to men'. http://merryfarmer.net/2012/03/medieval-monday-cities-crafts-and-guilds/ 

Last invasion of Britain

On 22 February 1797 the last invasion of mainland Britain took place.The French landed near Fishguard in Wales but they soon surrendered.www.localhistories.org/wales

Friday, 19 February 2016

Copernicus

On 19 February 1473 Nicolaus Copernicus the man who realised the Earth orbits the Sun was born www.localhistories.org/copernicus

Thursday, 18 February 2016

Pluto

Happy birthday Pluto. It was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh on 18 February 1930. (The name Pluto was suggested by an 11 year old girl called Venetia Burney). www.localhistories.org/outerplanets 

Wednesday, 17 February 2016

Friday, 12 February 2016

Charles Darwin

Happy birthday Charles Darwin, the most famous person from Shrewsbury (apart from Cadfael, of course) www.localhistories.org/darwin 

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

Captain Scott

On 10 February 1913 the bodies of Captain Scott and his companions were found in Antarctica www.localhistories.org/scott

Tuesday, 9 February 2016

Pancakes

Pancakes were invented because people were not allowed to eat eggs or butter during Lent. They used up the last of them by making pancakes. Its Shrove Tuesday because shrive meant absolve a sinner of his sins. People confessed to a priest and were 'shriven' before Lent. www.localhistories.org/desserts 

Monday, 8 February 2016

Catherine I

On 8 February 1725 Catherine I became the first woman to rule Russia. She ruled till 1727. Other women were Anna (1730-1740), Elizabeth (1741-1762) and of course Catherine the Great (1762-1796). She was one of the most powerful women rulers in history. www.localhistories.org/russia 

Thursday, 4 February 2016

Sri Lanka

Happy birthday Sri Lanka, independent 4 February 1948 www.localhistories.org/srilanka

Sunday, 31 January 2016

Saturday, 30 January 2016

Thursday, 28 January 2016

Henry VIII

28 January 1547 was a sad day. Our great king Henry VIII died. www.localhistories.org/Henryviii

Derek Bentley

On 28 January 1953 Derek Bentley was hanged for murder even though another man fired the fatal shot. (Bentley was unarmed and he had surrendered to the police when the shot was fired). Bentley was pardoned in 1998. www.localhistories.org/capital 

Wednesday, 27 January 2016

Monday, 25 January 2016

Winter Olympics

Happy birthday Winter Olympics. The first ones opened on 25 January 1924 in France. www.localhistories.org/games 

Saturday, 23 January 2016

Elizabeth Blackwell

On 23 January 1849 Elizabeth Blackwell became the first woman in the USA to receive a medical degree. The first woman doctor in Britain was Elizabeth Garrett Anderson in 1865.

Sunday, 17 January 2016

Captain Cook

On 17 January 1773 Captain Cook became the first man to cross the Antarctic Circle. www.localhistories.org/cook 

Friday, 15 January 2016

Saturday, 9 January 2016

Income Tax

On 9 January 1799 British prime minister William Pitt introduced income tax. It was set at 10%. As they say nothing in life is certain except death and taxes.

Friday, 8 January 2016

Galileo

On 8 January 1642 Galileo died but on 8 January 1942 Stephen Hawking was born www.localhistories.org/galileo 

Tuesday, 5 January 2016

Egyptian parties

For entertainment the Egyptians loved parties. If a rich person invited you to a feast, singers, musicians, dancers, jugglers, wrestlers and jesters would entertain you. Musicians played wooden flutes, harps, lutes, drums and clappers. At a rich person's banquet guests were given a cone of perfumed fat to put on their heads. It slowly melted leaving the wearer smelling nice. www.localhistories.org/games 

Monday, 4 January 2016

Rose Heilbron

On 4 January 1972 Rose Heilbron became the first woman judge at the Old Bailey (The central criminal court in London) www.localhistories.org/womanfamoushist.html 

Sunday, 3 January 2016